SMSF’s closing the age & gender gap

Self-managed super funds (SMSFs) have emerged from a difficult year stronger than ever. Not only have balances been repaired after the initial market shock in the early days of COVID-19, but more young people and women are taking control of their retirement savings.

At the end of March there were 597,396 SMSFs with 1,120,936 members, according to the ATOs latest SMSF Statistical Report for March 2021.

Numbers have been increasing steadily this financial year after a short decline in the June quarter last year. In the nine months to March this year, there were an additional 16,817 SMSFs in operation with 32,054 new members. And they are not necessarily who you might expect.

The changing face of SMSFs

It’s often assumed that SMSFs are for older, wealthy retirees, mostly men, who enjoy tinkering with their investments. While that may have been true once, times are changing.

The ATO report shows Australians under age 45 now make up around 47 per cent of all new SMSF trustees. The largest group by age to set up a fund in the March quarter was the 35-44 age bracket, accounting for 34 per cent of new funds. Coming a distant second, the 45-49 age group established 18 per cent of funds.

What’s more, women are diving in at an earlier age than men. While men still account for more SMSF establishments overall than women, at 56 per cent and 44 per cent respectively in the March quarter, 65 per cent of women were under 50 when they set up their fund compared with 62 per cent of men.

So what’s attracting younger people to SMSFs?

The advantages of starting early

The sooner you take control of your super, the better your retirement outcome is likely to be. SMSFs not only give you more control over your investments, but they also provide more flexibility to:

  • Invest in assets such as real property and collectibles which you can’t access in other types of super funds,
  • Manage your tax to suit your personal circumstances, and
  • Develop an estate plan to ensure the best tax outcomes for your beneficiaries.

That said, it’s generally agreed that an SMSF becomes more cost effective than other types of funds once you have accumulated $200,000 or more in super. That means someone on a higher-than-average salary with Super Guarantee (SG) payments from their employer of $10,000 to $15,000 a year will likely be in their late 30s before an SMSF becomes cost effective.

This was backed up by the ATO report which revealed the taxable income range with the highest number of new SMSFs was the $100,000 to $150,000 bracket. This group accounted for 19 per cent of new funds, followed by the $80,000 to $100,000 bracket which accounted for 14 per cent.

Those who have the means may be able to build up their balance sooner via salary sacrifice or personal super contributions.

Shares and property bounce back

The rise in total funds and members was also reflected in a jump in total SMSF assets to $787.1 billion in the March quarter, up more than 13 per cent over the year.

For those curious about where other SMSF trustees are investing, the top asset types are listed shares (26 per cent of total assets worth $207.4 billion) and cash and term deposits (19 per cent or $149.4 billion). Shares have bounced back strongly since March last year, mostly at the expense of cash and term deposits, as SMSFs reinvest some of their cash holdings.

The booming property market was also reflected in the biggest increase in limited recourse borrowing arrangements (LRBAs) since 2019. LRBAs, popular with SMSF residential property investors, increased by $3.5 billion over the March quarter alone to $59.4 billion, or 7.5 per cent of total SMSF assets.

Happy SMSF customers

There’s nothing like booming markets to put a smile on investors’ faces, but a recent survey shows SMSF trustees are happier than most.

Roy Morgan’s April Superannuation Satisfaction Report showed overall super fund satisfaction increased by 7 percentage points to almost 72 per cent over the year. But SMSFs had the highest customer satisfaction at 81 per cent.i

Clearly, SMSFs are providing real value for more Australians at an increasingly earlier age. But getting expert advice is crucial, especially in the early stages, to ensure your fund is set up correctly to provide the outcomes you want.

If you would like to discuss your current SMSF strategy or whether an SMSF is appropriate for you, give us a call and speak to one of our Financial Advisors on 03 5120 1400 or book a consultation via our website.

All statistics taken from the ATO SMSF Statistical Report for March 2021, https://data.gov.au/data/dataset/self-managed-superannuation-funds/resource/c2d3808d-fc2c-41bd-8122-b8e83fe22188

i http://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8703-superannuation-satisfaction-april-2021-202105250447

Material contained in this publication is a summary only and is based on information believed to be reliable and received from sources within the market. It is not the intention of RGM Financial Planners Pty Ltd ABN 36 419 582 Australian Financial Services Licence Number 229471, RGM Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd ABN 69 528 723 510 or RGM Finance Brokers Pty Ltd ABN 81 330 778 236 (RGM) that this publication be used as the primary source of readers’ information but as an adjunct to their own resources and training. No representation is given, warranty made or responsibility taken as to the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any information or recommendation contained in this publication and RGM and its related bodies corporate will not be liable to the reader in contract or tort (including for negligence) or otherwise for any loss or damage arising as a result of the reader relying on any such information or recommendation (except in so far as any statutory liability cannot be excluded).

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.





Federal Budget 2021-22 Analysis

Investing in recovery

In his third and possibly last Budget before the next federal election, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is counting on a new wave of spending to ensure Australia’s economic recovery maintains its momentum.

As expected, the focus is on jobs and major new spending on support for aged care, women and first-home buyers with some superannuation sweeteners for good measure.

With the emphasis on spending, balancing the Budget has been put on the back burner until employment and wages pick up.

The big picture

This year’s Budget is based on a successful vaccine rollout which would allow Australia’s borders to open from mid-2022. The Treasurer says he expects all Australians who want to be vaccinated could have two doses by the end of the year.

So far, the economic outlook is better than anyone dared hope at the height of the pandemic just a year ago, but challenges remain.

Unemployment, at 5.6%, has already fallen below pre-pandemic levels and is expected to fall sharply to 5% by mid-2022. But wage growth remains stubbornly low, currently growing at rate of 1.25% and forecast to rise by just 1.5% next year. This is well below inflation which is forecast to rise 3.5% in 2020-21 and 1.75% in 2021-22.

The treasurer forecast a budget deficit of $161 billion this financial year (7.8% of GDP), $52.7 billion less than expected just six months ago, and $106.6 billion (5% of GDP) in 2021-22.

Net debt is forecast to increase to an eye-watering $617.5 billion (30% of GDP) by June this year before peaking at $920.4 billion four years from now.

The large improvement in the deficit has been underpinned by the stronger than expected economic recovery and booming iron ore prices. Iron ore prices have surged 44% this year to a record US$228 recently.i

Funding for aged care

The centrepiece of the Budget is a $17.7 billion commitment over five years to implement key recommendations of the Aged Care Royal Commission. This includes $7.8 billion to reform residential aged care and $6.5 billion for an immediate investment in an additional 80,000 Home Care Packages.

In other health-related initiatives, the Treasurer announced additional funding of $13.2 billion over the next four years for the National Disability Insurance Scheme, taking total funding to $122 billion.

And in recognition of the toll the pandemic has taken on the nation’s mental health, the Government will provide an extra $2.3 billion for mental health and suicide prevention services.

Focus on Women

After criticism that last year’s Budget did not do enough to support women’s economic engagement, this Budget works hard to restore gender equity. The Women’s Budget Statement outlines total spending of $3.4 billion on women’s safety and economic security.

Funding initiatives include:

  • Funding for domestic violence prevention more than doubled to at least $680 million.
  • Funding for women’s health, including cervical and breast cancer and endometriosis and reproductive health, boosted by $354 million over the next four years.ii
  • Increased subsidies for second and subsequent children in childcare from a maximum of 85% to 95%, while families with household incomes above $189,390 will no longer have their annual payments capped at $10,560.iii

While childcare is of benefit to all parents, it is generally mothers who rely on affordable care to increase their working hours.

As widely touted, proposed changes to superannuation and support for first home buyers also have women in mind.

Superannuation gets a boost

In a move that will benefit part-time workers who are largely women, the Treasurer announced he will scrap the requirement for workers to earn at least $450 a month before their employers are obliged to pay super.

The Government will also expand a scheme allowing retirees to make a one-off super contribution of up to $300,000 (or $600,000 per couple) when they downsize and sell their family home. The age requirement will be lowered from 65 to 60.

In addition, from 1 July 2022 the work test that currently applies to super contributions (when either making or receiving non-concessional or salary sacrificed contributions) made by people aged 67 to 74 will be abolished.

Despite opposition from within Coalition ranks, Superannuation Guarantee payments by employers will increase from the current 9.5% of earnings to 10% on 1 July and then gradually increase to 12% as originally legislated.

Support for first home buyers

Housing affordability is on the agenda again as the property market booms. To help first home buyers and single parents get a foot on the housing ladder, the Government has announcediv:

  • The Family Home Guarantee, which will allow 10,000 single parents to buy a home with a deposit of just 2%.
  • An extra 10,000 places on the First Home Loan Deposit Scheme in 2020-21. Now called the New Home Guarantee, the scheme gives loan guarantees to first home buyers, so they can buy a home with a deposit as low as 5%.
  • An increase in the maximum voluntary contributions that Australians can release under the First Home Super Saver Scheme from $30,000 to $50,000.

Improvements to the Pensions Loan Scheme

In a move that will please cash-strapped pensioners, the Treasurer announced that the Pensions Loan scheme – a form of reverse mortgage offered by the Government – will allow people to withdraw a capped lump sum from 1 July 2022. Currently income must be taken as regular income, which makes it difficult to fund larger purchases or home maintenance.

Under the new rules, a single person will be able to withdraw up to the equivalent to 50% of the maximum Age Pension each year, currently around $12,385 a year ($18,670 for couples).

The Government will also introduce a No Negative Equity Guarantee which means the loan amount can never exceed the value of the home.

Tax cuts for low-and-middle-income earners

Approximately ten million Australians will avoid a drop in income of up to $1,080 next financial year, with the low-and-middle-income tax offset extended for another 12 months at a cost of $7.8 billion.

Anyone earning between $37,000 and $126,000 a year will receive some benefit, with people earning between $48,001 and $90,000 to receive the full offset of $1,080.

Low and middle income tax offset

Taxable incomeOffset
$37,000 or less$255
Between $37,001 and $48,000$255 plus 7.5 cents for every dollar above $37,000, up to a maximum of $1,080
Between $48,001 and $90,000$1,080
Between $90,001 and $126,000$1,080 minus 3 cents for every dollar of the amount above $90,000

Source: ATO

Job creation and training

With companies warning of labour shortages while the nation’s borders are closed, the Government has been under pressure to do more to help unemployed Australians back into work.

So, the focus in this Budget is squarely on skills training with $6.4 billion on offer to increase workforce participation and help boost economic growth.

This includes a 12-month extension to the Government’s JobTrainer program to December 2022 and an additional 163,000 places. The Treasurer also announced funding of $2.7 billion for 170,000 new apprenticeships.

Job creation is also at the heart of an extra $15.2 billion in road and rail infrastructure projects, expected to create 30,000 jobs. This is on top of the existing 10-year $110 billion infrastructure spend announced previously.

Looking ahead

With an election due by May 21 next year, this is as much an election Budget as a COVID-recovery one. Although another Budget could be squeezed in before an election, it would have to be brought forward from the normal time.

The Government will be hoping that it has done enough to provide funds where they are needed most to continue the job of economic recovery.

If you have any questions about any of the Budget measures and how you might take advantage of them, don’t hesitate to contact us on 03 5120 1400.

Information in this article has been sourced from the Budget Speech 2021-22 and Federal Budget support documents.

It is important to note that the policies outlined in this publication are yet to be passed as legislation and therefore may be subject to change.

https://tradingeconomics.com/commodities (viewed 11/5/2021)

ii https://www.health.gov.au/ministers/the-hon-greg-hunt-mp/media/354-million-to-support-the-health-and-wellbeing-of-australias-women

iii https://ministers.treasury.gov.au/ministers/josh-frydenberg-2018/media-releases/making-child-care-more-affordable-and-boosting

iv https://ministers.treasury.gov.au/ministers/josh-frydenberg-2018/media-releases/improving-opportunities-home-ownership

Material contained in this publication is a summary only and is based on information believed to be reliable and received from sources within the market. It is not the intention of RGM Financial Planners Pty Ltd ABN 36 419 582 Australian Financial Services Licence Number 229471, RGM Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd ABN 69 528 723 510 or RGM Finance Brokers Pty Ltd ABN 81 330 778 236 (RGM) that this publication be used as the primary source of readers’ information but as an adjunct to their own resources and training. No representation is given, warranty made or responsibility taken as to the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any information or recommendation contained in this publication and RGM and its related bodies corporate will not be liable to the reader in contract or tort (including for negligence) or otherwise for any loss or damage arising as a result of the reader relying on any such information or recommendation (except in so far as any statutory liability cannot be excluded).

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.


There’s more than one way to Boost your retirement income

After spending their working life building retirement savings, many retirees are often reluctant to eat into their “nest egg” too quickly. This is understandable, given that we are living longer than previous generations and may need to pay for aged care and health costs later in life.

But this cautious approach also means many retirees are living more frugally than they need to. This was one of the key messages from the Government’s recent Retirement Income Review, which found most people die with the bulk of the wealth they had at retirement intact.i

One of the benefits of advice is that we can help you plan your retirement income so you know how much you can afford to spend today, secure in the knowledge that your future needs are covered.

Minimum super pension withdrawals

Under superannuation legislation, once you retire and transfer your super into a pension account, you must withdraw a minimum amount each year. This amount increases from 4 per cent of your account balance for retirees aged under 65 to 14 per cent for those aged 95 and over. (These rates have been halved temporarily for the 2020 and 2021 financial years due to COVID-19.)

One of the common misconceptions about our retirement system, according to the Retirement Income Review, is that these minimum drawdowns are what the Government recommends. Instead, they are there to ensure retirees use their super to fund their retirement, rather than as a store of tax-advantaged wealth to pass down the generations.

In practice, super is unlikely to be your only source of retirement income.

The three pillars

Most retirees live on a combination of Age Pension topped up with income from super and other investments – the so-called three pillars of our retirement system. Yet despite compulsory super being around for almost 30 years, over 70 per cent of people aged 66 and over still receive a full or part-Age Pension.

While the Retirement Income Review found most of today’s retirees have adequate retirement income, it argued they could do better. Not by saving more, but by using what they have more efficiently.

Withdrawing more of your super nest egg is one way of improving retirement outcomes, but for those who could still do with extra income the answer could lie in your nest.

Unlocking housing wealth

Australian retirees are some of the wealthiest in the world, with median household wealth of around $1.4 million. Yet close to $1 million of this wealth is tied up in the family home.

That’s a lot of money to leave to the kids, especially when many retirees end up living in homes that are too large while they struggle to afford the retirement lifestyle they had hoped for.

For these reasons there is growing interest in ways that allow retirees to tap into their home equity. Of course, not everyone will want or need to take advantage of these options. But if you are looking for ways to use your home to generate retirement income, but don’t relish the thought of welcoming Airbnb guests, here are some options:

  • Downsizer contributions to your super. If you are aged 65 or older and sell your home, perhaps to buy something smaller, you may be able to put up to $300,000 of the proceeds into super (up to $600,000 for couples).
  • The Pension Loans Scheme (PLS). Offered by the government via Centrelink, the PLS allows older Australians to receive tax-free fortnightly income by taking out a loan against the equity in their home. The loan plus interest (currently 4.5 per cent per year) is repaid when you sell or after your death.
  • Reverse Mortgages (also called equity release or home equity schemes). Similar to the PLS but offered by commercial providers. Unlike the PLS, drawdowns can be taken as a lump sum, income stream or line of credit but this flexibility comes at the cost of higher interest rates.
The big picture

While super is important, for most people it’s not the only source of retirement income.

If you would like to discuss your retirement income needs and how to make the most of your assets, give us a call on 03 5120 1400 and speak to a Financial Adviser.

i Retirement Income Review, https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-11/p2020-100554-complete-report.pdf

Material contained in this publication is a summary only and is based on information believed to be reliable and received from sources within the market. It is not the intention of RGM Financial Planners Pty Ltd ABN 36 419 582 Australian Financial Services Licence Number 229471, RGM Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd ABN 69 528 723 510 or RGM Finance Brokers Pty Ltd ABN 81 330 778 236 (RGM) that this publication be used as the primary source of readers’ information but as an adjunct to their own resources and training. No representation is given, warranty made or responsibility taken as to the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any information or recommendation contained in this publication and RGM and its related bodies corporate will not be liable to the reader in contract or tort (including for negligence) or otherwise for any loss or damage arising as a result of the reader relying on any such information or recommendation (except in so far as any statutory liability cannot be excluded).

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.

Turning Redundancy into opportunity

As the economy starts to recover from COVID-19 shutdowns, some sectors may take longer than others to return to their normal operating capacity and some companies may never fully recover. That means there is still the chance that some employees could be made redundant.

If you are offered redundancy, how can you turn a potentially bad situation into a new opportunity?

In the first instance, make sure that you negotiate a good redundancy settlement. By law you are entitled to a certain amount depending on your years of service with the company.i You may or may not come under an award, but the Fair Work ombudsman has a calculator so you can work out your entitlement.

You may even be able to negotiate an increased payment (a golden handshake) in order to keep confidential any specialist knowledge that you may have.

Your redundancy payment may include long service leave, holiday pay and sick leave, so it can be a sizeable amount and that creates opportunity.


How is it taxed?

But first, how much will you end up with after tax? There is a tax-free element for redundancy payments, calculated as a base amount (currently $10,989) plus a service amount ($5,496) multiplied by the numbers of years of service. So, if you have 10 years’ service, your tax-free amount is $65,949.ii

Any redundancy payment above this amount is your Employment Termination Payment (ETP) and subject to tax. If you are below your preservation age (the age at which you can access your super) you would pay 30 per cent plus the Medicare levy on this sum or 15 per cent plus Medicare if you are older than your preservation age. In both cases this tax rate applies up to $210,000 with the balance subject to 45 per cent tax plus Medicare regardless of your age.

So what should you do with this money? A large sum can present many opportunities although much will depend on your present circumstances such as how close you are to retirement and what your financial commitments are.

If you are hoping to find another job, assume this could take at least six months, so make sure you have sufficient funds.

Now is the time to take stock of your household budget and look at ways to reduce your overheads to control your immediate demands. For instance, you may look at selling your second car.

But don’t rush to cancel everything. Indeed, your income protection policy, for instance, could still play an important role. Before you act, ask your insurer if they would consider waiving the premiums for a few months. Just because you have lost your job, does not mean you will not be covered if something should preclude you from working in another job. You may well find you are still covered even if you are not currently employed.


Look to the future

Depending on your circumstances, you could consider using some of your redundancy payout to improve your overall financial situation. You could reduce your mortgage and other debts, or perhaps to make an investment or fund a business opportunity.

If you are approaching retirement age, then you might consider putting some of your redundancy pay into super. While this may still be a good idea if you are younger, remember you could be unemployed for longer than six months and you wouldn’t want your money locked in super until you reach preservation age.

If you are still expecting to have a few more years in the workforce, then take the time to seek professional help on your next move and think outside the square. So, rather than just find a similar position to the one you have lost in the same industry, look at widening your horizons. A professional career advisor can help. In many cases, employers provide such assistance as part of a redundancy package.

While redundancy can be confronting, if you think of it as a catalyst for change then you may find it’s one of the best things that has happened to you.

If you need any guidance please contact us to discuss how to make the most of your redundancy payment on 03 5120 1400.

https://www.fairwork.gov.au/ending-employment/redundancy/redundancy-pay-and-entitlements

ii https://www.ato.gov.au/business/your-workers/in-detail/taxation-of-termination-payments/?page=4

Material contained in this publication is a summary only and is based on information believed to be reliable and received from sources within the market. It is not the intention of RGM Financial Planners Pty Ltd ABN 36 419 582 Australian Financial Services Licence Number 229471, RGM Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd ABN 69 528 723 510 or RGM Finance Brokers Pty Ltd ABN 81 330 778 236 (RGM) that this publication be used as the primary source of readers’ information but as an adjunct to their own resources and training. No representation is given, warranty made or responsibility taken as to the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any information or recommendation contained in this publication and RGM and its related bodies corporate will not be liable to the reader in contract or tort (including for negligence) or otherwise for any loss or damage arising as a result of the reader relying on any such information or recommendation (except in so far as any statutory liability cannot be excluded).

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.


Life cover: More essential than ever

Living through COVID-19 has brought many challenges and shifting priorities as we deal with the financial impacts of the pandemic, and that includes the issue of life insurance.

On the one hand, the pandemic has highlighted the importance of life cover. On the other, those who may have lost a job or lost income are questioning its necessity.

Many Australians continue to view life insurance as a discretionary item. This is in stark contrast to car or home insurance which are seen as necessities. It seems we are willing to insure our property but not the thing that matters most – our life and our ability to earn an income.

Conflicting priorities

survey by KPMG found that only 35 per cent of Australians thought life insurance was essential and just 30 per cent believed they needed income protection. But when it comes to car insurance, 79 per cent viewed cover as essential and yet, during COVID-19, car usage reduced as many were working from home and restricting their movements.

As the COVID-19 health crisis has reinforced our vulnerability in terms of health and the fragility of life, the need for life and income protection insurance has probably never been greater.

What would happen if you became too sick to return to work or if you passed away? Who would pay the mortgage, living costs, health insurance and utility bills for you or the family you left behind? For those with outstanding debt and dependants, life insurance will always be an important consideration.

It should also be remembered that the current health crisis does not rule out people getting sick with other illnesses, some linked to COVID-19 and some not. Mental health is one these health issues and is becoming increasingly prevalent.

Claims on the rise

In the June quarter, the life insurance industry reported a net after-tax loss of $179 million on its individual income protection products, driven largely by claims for mental health issues in the wake of COVID-19.i Mental health claims are expected to grow even further as it is thought most people take more than a year to report such issues.

With claims on the uptick, this has meant the insurance industry is either looking to increase premiums or already has. This, in turn, may discourage people from keeping their cover.

Indeed, the KPMG survey said that 38 per cent of policy holders were looking to cancel their income protection insurance in the next 12 months, and 25 per cent were planning to drop life cover.

On the plus side, many Australians have some level of life and income protection insurance in their super. However, if you were to lose your job, then paying premiums on your insurance in super would come out of your fund balance, reducing your retirement savings over time.

Also, your insurance might well cease when you lose your job unless you opt to take out a private policy. You generally have 60 days to take up this option.

Redundancy payments

If your income protection insurance is outside super, then be mindful that not all policies include redundancy claims. And those that do may have restrictions. For instance, there is usually a wait period of up to 28 days before any payments will be made.

If you are thinking of taking out a policy now to cover you in case of redundancy given the current economic environment, then you will probably have to go through a six-month no-claim period before you can benefit. During that six-month period, there must be no indication from your employer that redundancy may be on the cards.

Many insurance companies recognise the financial and personal difficulties many people currently face and some have offered to reduce or even suspend premiums without any loss of continuity to your policy.

One alternative may be to look at reducing the cover you have so that your premiums reduce. But it’s important to be mindful of your needs and ensure you have adequate cover.

The road ahead

The insurance industry, like many others, is being forced to look at a different way of doing business in a post-COVID-19 world, with simpler policies and flat premiums all being discussed.

In the meantime, making quick decisions on whether you still need insurance, or your current level of insurance, may prove a mistake. If you are thinking about altering your cover, get in touch with us first to discuss your insurance needs.

i https://www.fsc.org.au/news/income-protection

Material contained in this publication is a summary only and is based on information believed to be reliable and received from sources within the market. It is not the intention of RGM Financial Planners Pty Ltd ABN 36 419 582 Australian Financial Services Licence Number 229471, RGM Accountants & Advisors Pty Ltd ABN 69 528 723 510 or RGM Finance Brokers Pty Ltd ABN 81 330 778 236 (RGM) that this publication be used as the primary source of readers’ information but as an adjunct to their own resources and training. No representation is given, warranty made or responsibility taken as to the accuracy, timeliness or completeness of any information or recommendation contained in this publication and RGM and its related bodies corporate will not be liable to the reader in contract or tort (including for negligence) or otherwise for any loss or damage arising as a result of the reader relying on any such information or recommendation (except in so far as any statutory liability cannot be excluded).

Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation.






Tax-effective ways to boost your super

After a year when the average superannuation balance fell slightly or, at best, moved sideways, the summer holidays could be a good opportunity to think about ways to rebuild your savings while being mindful of tax.

With the Reserve Bank reducing interest rates to record lows and not anticipating a rise until 2024, it’s more important than ever to ensure your retirement savings are working as hard as possible. 

One way to do that is by taking advantage of super, which offers valuable opportunities to tax-effectively rebuild your retirement savings. 

Reducing your tax bill

If you make super contributions by setting up a salary sacrifice arrangement with your employer, for example, you can potentially reduce your tax bill while also boosting your super. 

By diverting some of your pre-tax salary into super rather than taking it as take home pay, your money will be taxed at 15 per cent, rather than your marginal tax rate. 

Investments made through super also enjoy a concessional tax rate of only 15 per cent on any investment earnings. This compares with tax at your marginal rate, which could be as high as 47 per cent (including the Medicare Levy), on investment earnings outside super. 

Claim a tax deduction

You are also able to make personal super contributions on which you claim a tax deduction. 

Previously only available to the self-employed, this strategy is now available to everyone. It allows you to claim a tax deduction in your annual tax return for eligible voluntary contributions into your super account made during the financial year from your after-tax earnings. 

Providing you stay under the annual concessional contribution limit (currently $25,000 a year), this can be a useful way to cut the amount of income you pay tax on. 

Play catch-up with your contributions

If you have less than $500,000 in your super account, you may consider making carry-forward concessional contributions. If you haven’t fully used your annual concessional contributions caps since 1 July 2018, you may have some unused cap amounts that you could use to make a larger contribution this financial year. 

Unused concessional cap amounts can now be carried forward for up to five years. 

Consider non-concessional contributions

If you have more funds available and are closer to retirement, you might also consider making a non-concessional (after tax) contribution into your super account to boost the amount you have in the run-up to retirement. 

Generally, you can contribute up to $100,000 a year in after-tax money. Not only is the tax on investment earnings on these contributions only 15 per cent, but they boost the income you can enjoy tax-free in retirement. 

If you have a larger amount available, from an inheritance or selling an asset for example, you could even consider making a bring-forward contribution of up to $300,000 in a single year if you are under age 65. 

Get the government to contribute

Another opportunity for eligible low to middle income earners is to make a personal after tax contribution of up to $1,000 and potentially receive a co contribution of up to $500 from the government. The co-contribution amount will vary depending on your income and the amount of contributions you make, but it can be an easy way to increase your super balance. 

Another tax strategy to consider if your spouse or de facto partner earns less than $40,000 is to make an after-tax contribution into their super account. You could be eligible for the maximum tax offset of up to $540 if you make a contribution of at least $3,000 into your spouse’s super account, provided they earn $37,000 or less. The tax offset tapers off as your spouse’s income increases before cutting out at $40,000. 

Strategic review of asset allocation

As super is a structure for investing, not an investment in its own right, it might also be a good time to take a closer look at the mix of assets in your super. 

After COVID-induced market volatility, and with historically low interest rates, your allocation may have drifted away from your strategic plan. 

With the right advice, tax-effective super strategies offer an easy way to rebuild your retirement savings and achieve your overall wealth creation goals. 

If you would like to discuss your super or investment strategy, get in touch with one of our financial advisers on 03 5120 1400.

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